Woman in Politics

By E. Grace Inglese

(From:  Weekend Dispatch, May 29, 1976)

"I know I miss playing bridge and tennis and going to the theater with women friends, but I'm adjusting, and meeting so many interesting people in political fields is a compensation."  -- Mayor Eleanor Kieliszek of Teaneck

Contrary to popular belief, the woman in politics is faring well in her battle against discrimination by male contemporaries and the effects of the political spotlight upon her private life.

A personal life of her own is not "squeezed out" by the demands of her public duties, but rather, it appears, she "makes the time" for the quiet dinner with her husband or the noisy, happy day in the country with the children and the grandchildren.

If there are "victims" of the hectic schedule demanded of her, they are the ol' time friends, the gals she shared mugs of coffee with when the kids were very young or the pals who saved her a seat at the Woman's Clubs or the PTA events.

"I know I miss playing bridge and tennis and going to the theater with women friends, but I'm adjusting, and meeting so many interesting people in political fields is a compensation," emphasizes Mayor Eleanor Kleliszek of Teaneck.

The mother of four, Mayor Klellszek is able to keep the home fires burning by performing her mayoral duties while working from her own house.

Younger Men Discriminate

As the leader of 42,500 people, Mrs. Kleilszek observes that it is the younger man who is likely to discriminate against her as a woman in politics. Older men, contemporaries who have worked with her for several years, treat her as their equal and respect her as their mayor, she explains.

 

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