PROGRESS IN HEALING THE SICK

In this age of constantly changing principles and feverish unrest there is little time for reflection or retrospection; the accent is rather on
progress, still greater efficiency and service, and Holy Name Hospital cannot be an exception.

But to its pioneers it is extremely gratifying to stop and look back to the day when in spite of numerous obstacles, they set forth upon a special labor of faith and love. The general belief at the time was that Bergen County did not need another hospital, but the challenge was not of a material nature; it was to something nobler and higher, reaching out to the soul as well as to the body of the suffering neighbor.

And so, at the earnest request of Doctors Frank C. McCormack and George P. Pitkin, our Sisters assumed the responsibility of building and organizing what became a joyful reality on October 4, 1925. On that day Holy Name Hospital, thoroughly equipped and scientifically complete, was opened to the public.

Its achievements and rapid development surpassed all expectation. From its very beginning, the ladies from the adjoining communities, through the influence of the above-mentioned doctors, pledged their allegiance and formed auxiliaries that have worked hand in hand with the Sisters. Their unflagging interest and loyalty have earned for them the admiration of those in the hospital field, even outside of New Jersey State.

The increase of nurse applicants rose so constantly and rapidly that in a few years a nurses' residence became a necessity. The building of the new, far-famed George Washington Bridge had its effect upon the hospital also, when Teaneck became one of the fastest growing towns in the United States. This influx of population brought so many additional patients to Holy Name, that a new seventy-bed wing had to be built and put into operation in 1931. And now, ten years later, crowded conditions demand still further physical expansion. Besides, the modern and hospital-minded public is today looking for hospitalization at the hands of trained, educated and skilled personnel. Advances in medicine and science proceeding from higher educational levels make inevitable the need of special preparation for every phase of hospital service.

While the Sisters must keep in step with the trends and standards of the age, they can never permit themselves to stray from the sight of the good Samaritan. Whether the Sisters' hospital is to be a "business or not a business"--as questioned at the annual hospital conventions--will depend upon the motives and spirit of its staff. If they are guided by the primary objective with which they entered upon the work, namely, to serve God's poor, whether sick in mind or in body; to serve them with Him Who spent Himself in a gentle, tireless ministration to all mankind and to serve for that Divine Physician, Who alone can give success to all "business," they will prove that their hospital is something beyond the realm of any business.

SISTER M. EVANGELISTA, Superior.

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

ORTHOPEDIC Surgery is the youngest of the surgical specialties; but at Holy Name Hospital it is a thriving infant indeed. As the staff was originally organized, there was no such department, and no provision for an orthopedic clinic. It was considered that the hospital was so "deep in the woods," so far off the beaten track, that the crippled and the lame would certainly not seek treatment here. How inaccurate was that prediction can be seen in the throngs, both of children and of adults, who now crowd the orthopedic clinic.

Among causes of this continued growth are the use of the latest methods of treatment, where these have passed the experimental stage, and the installation of the most advanced equipment both in the oper- ating rooms and in the physical therapy department. An example of this is seen in the fact that, in less than fifteen years, no less than three fracture-orthopedic operating tables have been purchased, the one now in use representing the last word in such equipment.

Perhaps the most outstanding feature of the department is the extensive use of bone-grafting technique in place of metal plates and screws of steel and alloys which have heretofore been so widely used. An original operation, involving the transplantation of bone, has even been devised.

Recognition of the standing of the department was indicated during the past year by the Governor's appointment of its director as the medical member of the Crippled Children's Commission for the State of New Jersey.

THE YEAR'S WORK

DEMANDS for care in 1940 continued to increase as they have done in almost every year since the hospital was opened.

During the year 5,278 patients received 60,100 patient days of care, as compared with 5,107 patients and 56,027 days in the previous year.

These yearly increases cannot continue in the present buildings, for the service in most departments has now reached a ceiling beyond which it cannot go. We have a waiting list which gradually grows longer, and we are worried by the growing number of patients whose admission we must put off until suitable beds are available. We ask forbearance from all our friends when they hear of patients whom we are unable to admit, or when they themselves have such an experience. The reason is simply that we cannot crowd more beds or more patients into space already filled beyond proper capacity. Another reason is that whenever we have empty beds in some departments, they may not be suitable for some patients requiring care, as illustrated on a later page.

WORK DONE IN THE HOSPITAL
 
1940
15 YEARS (1935-1940)
Patients Admitted
5,273
56,837
Patient Days of Care
60,160
655,645
Babies Born
1,025
9,552
Surgical Operations
2,398
26,481
Laboratory Tests
42,912
336,363
X-Ray Examinations
8,379
77,665
Out Patient Visits
13,152
147,374
Admissions and Patient Days include Newborn.
In 1940 Newtorn were: 1,025 Patients, 10,276 Days.

 

Our hospital is a community institution and our wish is to familiarize the community as fully as possible with the work that we are doing. For that purpose we have issued our annual report for 1940 in a new form which we hope will present the main features of our hospital's service in an interesting way. Instead of confining ourselves to departmental reports we have included brief special articles on subjects of current interest to the general public.

Again we wish to extend our thanks to the many friends whose kindly thoughts and deeds have so greatly aided us in our work. To the Staff, the Auxiliaries, the County Board of Freeholders, contributing municipalities, individual contributors and the general public, whose interest in the hospital is so often shown, we express our appreciation in behalf of the ill and injured who come to us for care.

We are particularly grateful for the friendly labors of those about to carry through our building fund campaign. Our prayers go with them, and our most earnest hope that through their efforts the new building may soon rise, for indeed we need it most urgently.

SISTER M. ALPHONSUS, Administrator.

BERGEN COUNTY'S HEALTH

THE epidemic of influenza in 1918, with its high mortality, was largely aggravated by its complete unexpectedness and by a lack of hospital preparation for it under the stress of war, with thousands of men living under unusual conditions in the nation's training cantonments. That epidemic, not to speak of others more frightful in the long past, demonstrated how helpless even skilled doctors can find themselves when they are faced with a lack of ordinary hospital facilities for acute victims.

Thus today, with the trend of our thinking more and more toward preventive medicine and with the recent flu scare to put us on guard, the responsibility for the health of a hugely populated section such as Bergen County cannot but lie heavily on the consciences of its three great general hospitals. Bergen County is woefully under-hospitalized. In that regard cold facts and figures speak for themselves, for the county is the third largest in New Jersey as to population, and yet there are fifteen counties in the state far ahead of it in hospital facilities.

Beyond this, to aggravate the county's shortage of hospital beds, we are faced with a public which is growing more and more hospital- minded. The public has learned of preventive medicine, and now it flocks to our hospital laboratories for investigative tests, as witness the more than 42,000 laboratory tests made by Holy Name Hospital last year. At the same time, more and more expectant mothers are demanding hospitalization.

This growing hospital-mindedness should be a pleasant fact for contemplation by those who are interested in preserving a high standard of public health. Hospitals have, to a degree, stimulated it by their own missionary work in making the public realize the dangers of disease and its spread, as well as the perils of childbirth-its perfect naturalness as a function of womanhood, but also its extreme seriousness, requiring the best of care for mother and child during the pre-natal and post- natal periods.

But now that we have attained this result, we in Bergen County can very logically be accused of an inconsistency. We cannot supply a requirement which we have stimulated ourselves. Now that the public is on the alert, pathologically speaking--now that it demands hospitalization, we are unable fully to meet the demand.

This situation is not one of embarrassment alone, however. It contains an element of danger. A major disaster or an epidemic in this area would present a simple but unsolvable problem of lack of bed capacity for accident victims or acute cases. Even in the normal course of affairs, being over-crowded as we are now, the danger of greater over-crowding is for the individual patient just as serious. It is ever present as long as accident and disease continue to operate on an invisible schedule If chance and probability.

All this is why Holy Name Hospital plans an expansion of its plant in the coming year. Bergen County having described a phenomenal growth in the last five years, there is nothing to indicate that this growth will not continue, though perhaps at a more moderate speed.

Bergen County's hospitals today, as always, stand as guardians of the county's health. They cannot, however, as voluntary hospitals, expand to meet the county's growth unless the public comes forward with definite financial assistance. We believe in this near-crisis the public will not fail us, nor any other Bergen County hospital, when a sincere appeal, founded on logic and good sense, is made.

FRANK C. MCCORMACK, M.D., Medical Director.

PROGRESS IN ANESTHESIA

FROM the time Holy Name Hospital became outstanding as a pioneer in the use of spinal anesthesia under the leadership of Dr. Pitkin, the Anesthetic Department has continued to investigate and put into practical service new methods of alleviating pain.

During recent years the use of spinal anesthesia has continued at the hospital. Rapid strides being made by the science of anesthesiology, however, have contributed several other new anesthetic methods which are in considerable use. More and more the hospital is resorting to intravenous anesthesia. Many authorities believe this to be the anesthetic method of the future. They are using it with increasing frequency as fast as new phases of intravenous application are deemed safe and practical.

In the last two or three years, the Anesthetic Department has employed cyclopropane increasingly as an inhalant. In this regard, Holy Name Hospital has developed to a very high degree modem safeguards in handling volatile gases.

In the last year in a wide variety of operative problems, the hospital has successfully used nitrous oxide, ether and ethylene among the inhalants, and novocaine, nupercaine, pontocaine, spinocaine, and neospinocaine in spinal anesthesia and nerve blocking. Spinocaine and neospinocaine have been created by Dr. Pitkin in his experiments with this anesthetic group.

The hospital is tending more and more in its use of inhaled gases to the technic known as the "closed method" of application. By this method, the patient, as far as his respiratory function is concerned, is completely secluded from the air of the operating room. His oxygen supply is furnished in mixture with the anesthetic, his carbon dioxide is absorbed by soda lime and his breathing is under the complete control of the anesthetist from beginning to end of the operative period.


THE SCHOOL OF NURSING

HOLY NAME HoSPITAL'S School of Nursing was established in 1925. The hospital is accredited by the American Medical Association and the American College of Surgeons. The various courses of study offered in the School of Nursing are approved by the Department of Nursing of the State of New Jersey. Its aims and purposes are:

1. To prepare young women spiritually, intellectually, physically, socially, and esthetically to give skilled nursing care to the whole individual patient.
2. To prepare nurses for community health service in the hospital, school, home and industry.
3. To prepare women to meet the responsibilities of life in the profession and in the family.
4. To prepare young women to live wholesome, Christian lives and to contribute to the welfare of church, family and state.

A certificate of graduation from an accredited high school is required. To be eligible for a qualifying certificate to admit the candidate to the profesional study of registered nursing, the course in high school must include: English, four years; Science, three years, including Gen- eral Science, Biology and Chemistry; Social Studies, two years; Mathematics, one year.

The school is desirous of not only promoting educational interests, but also of fostering, to the fullest extent, the spiritual welfare of its students.

Courses in Ethics, Psychology and Religion are given by the Chaplain of the Hospital. Credit for these courses will be accorded by Seton Hall College to students who are desirous of pursuing the course of study leading to the Bachelor's Degree.

An annual health examination is included for all students during their course of study.

In case of illness, the hospital extends full privileges of medical care to the students.

The dietary program of the school is under the supervision of the dietary department of the Hospital.

Individual rooms are provided for students in residence. A vacation period of one month is granted annually.

Courses for Fall Semester, 1940, were as follows: Anatomy and Physiology, Case Study, Chemistry, Contagious Diseases, Ethics, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat biseases, First Aid, Materia Medica II, Medicine Applied to Nursing, Nursing Arts, Operating Room Technique, Professional Adjustments I, Psychology, Public Health Nursing, Religion I, II, III, Surgery Applied to Nursing.

Courses for Spring Semester, 1941, are as follows: Dental Surgery, Dietetics, Elementary Materia Medica, Ethics, First Aid, Gynecology, History of Nursing, Microbiology, Nursing Arts, Obstetrics, Operating Room Technique, Orthopedics, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Psychology, Religion I, II, III, Sociology.

MATERNITY SERVICE

DESPITE the present apparently commodious quarters, continually increasing demands for service necessitate the doubling of space and equipment in the Maternity Department.

This is evidenced by the tripling of the birth record of the hospital in the fifteen years of its existence. In 1926 a total of 366 babies was born here. In 1940 there were 1,025 births, without a maternal death.

The 1940 record also showed that twenty-two Caesarian births took place, including a pair of Caesarian twins. Ten other sets of twins were born in the hospital during the year.

The present equipment of the Maternity Department includes a nursery of 42 bassinets--often crowded--and 42 beds for mothers.

Temperature and humidity of the nursery are regulated mechanically. The most modem spray shower equipment is used in bathing the babies. All bedding and clothing are "Autoclaved" (sterilized under steam pressure) after being returned from the laundry.

In the isolation ward each baby has a separate unit--a cabinet in which his clothing is kept and upon which he is bathed and dressed, and a bassinet--with which no other child comes in contact.

Great importance is attached by the Maternity Department to the care of its new-born babies. For this reason more graduate nurses are employed in the new-born section than in any other department.

Individual formulas, special attention to incubator babies, administration of oxygen, individual instructions to the mother as to the care of the baby at home--these are but a few of the many services which, although routine to the hospital, may mean life itself to these most delicate little patients.

COMMUNITY SERVICE
Resident of Patients Admitted in 1940
Communities in
Bergen County:
1940
Population
Patient
Admitted
Patient
Days
*Service
Ratio
Communities in
Bergen County:
1940
Population
Patient
Admitted
Patient
Day
*Service
Ratio
Allendale
2,058
1
11
.5
Oakland
932
1
11
1
Alpine
626
1
6
.9
Old Tappan
609
13
139
21
Bergenfield
10,275
401
4,040
39
Oradell
2,802
33
345
12
Bogota
7,346
208
2,476
34
Palisades Park
8,141
201
2,369
29
Carlstadt
5,644
10
80
1
Paramus
3,688
47
468
13
Cliffside Park
16,892
136
1,747
10
Park Ridge
2,519
25
355
14
Closter
2,603
11
147
6
Ramsey
3,566
2
22
.6
Cresskill
2,246
20
262
12
Ridgefield
5,271
102
1,189
22
Demarest
1,165
15
169
14
Ridgefield Park
11,277
286
3,316
29
Dumont
7,556
273
3,165
42
Ridgewood
14,948
22
314
2
Edgewater
4,082
109
1,354
33
River Edge
3,287
46
411
12
Emerson
1,487
45
456
30
Rivervale
1,109
27
392
36
Englewood
18,966
234
2,650
14
Rochelle Park
2,495
81
807
36
Englewood Cliffs
888
11
225
25
Rutherford
15,466
33
360
2
Fairlawn
9,017
6
111
1
Saddle River Boro
510
6
58
11
Fairview
8,770
91
959
11
Teaneck (incl. West
Englewood)
25,274
888
9,893
39
Fort Lee
9,468
134
1,663
18
Garfield
28,044
11
90
.3
Tenafly
7,413
68
763
10
Glen Rock
5,177
5
41
.8
Waldwick
2,475
20
159
6
Hackensack
26,279
390
4,468
17
Washington Township
491
6
58
.1
Harrington Park
1,389
26
237
17
Westwood
5,388
139
1,721
32
Hasbrouck Heights
6,716
39
322
5
Woodcliff Lake
1,037
9
53
5
Haworth
1,419
17
297
21
Woodridge
5,739
16
121
2
Hillsdale
3,431
77
810
24
Wyckoff
3,924
2
21
.5
Hohokus
3,827
11
147
4
Some Nearby Communities:
Leonia
5,763
126
1,349
23
Bellevills
--
6
81
--
Little Ferry
4,545
60
651
14
Clifton
--
8
87
--
Lodi
11,552
12
131
1
Guttenberg
--
6
79
--
Lyndhurst
17,454
11
112
.6
Hawthorne
--
7
133
--
Maywood
4,052
55
601
15
Jersey City
--
5
82
--
Montvale
1,342
4
61
5
Newark
--
13
206
--
Moonachie
1,554
8
66
4
New York & Long Island
--
85
1,190
--
New Milford
3,215
52
567
18
North Bergen
--
61
784
--
North Arlington
9,904
9
265
3
Union City
--
27
304
--
Northvale
1,159
8
76
6
West New York
--
29
323
--
Norwood
1,512
17
214
14
* Number of patient days per 100 population.

A VOLUNTARY HOSPITAL

HOLY NAME HoSPITAL is one of nearly 3,000 voluntary hospitals in the United States. Do you know what a "voluntary" hospital is? The term will be easier to understand if you will consider the three broad types of hospitals.

VOLUNTARY: non-governmental, non-pront hospitals conducted by independent groups of citizens for the public welfare. They consist mostly of "general" hospitals, supplying general medical and surgical care.

GOVERNMENTAL: Federal--mostly for members of the armed forces and their dependents; State--mostly for mental patients; County--mostly for tubercular patients; City--mostly for general or communicable-disease patients.

PROPRIETARY: relatively small in size and often owned by doctors; conducted without legal restriction as to profit.

The total number of all types of registered hospitals in the United States is more than 6,000, and they admit about 10,000,000 patients every year. Nearly two-thirds of those patients--about 6,000,000--are treated in hospitals of the voluntary type.

It is important to understand that a voluntary hospital does not receive automatic support through taxation, as in the case of Government hospitals, but must stand on its own feet and justify its continued existence by the character of service it supplies to paying patients as well as to non-paying patients.

Most voluntary hospitals, like those in Bergen County, receive some auxiliary support out of tax funds. However, in Bergen County and in many other localities, such support amounts to much less than the free and below cost care given by these hospitals to patients who are unable to pay in full or at all.

While Federal, State, County and City hospitals have provided the most practical and satisfactory means of caring for certain special types of patients, the voluntary hospital has supplied the most satisfactory answer to the need of local communities for general medical and surgical care.

The voluntary hospital is a successful expression of the American tradition of free enterprise, local responsibility and community cooperation.

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAPLAIN

THE present day trend of philosophy translated into action, as evidenced by the spectacle of the modem world of chaos and tunnoil, seems to indicate quite clearly that men and nations have lost the idea of the dignity of the individual and the marvelous influence for good one can wield in his own small sphere.

True Christian philosophy has ever taught the dignity of the individual, the nobility of his calling, the individual influence each one can and must wield for good.

Conscious of the individual's dignity and his power for good in his allotted sphere, Holy Name Hospital has throughout the fifteen years of its existence striven to minister to man in his individual needs so that relieved from infirmity he can be returned a useful member of the community.

In all the various fields of work in the world to which man applies himself, there is no more noble task than that with which men rightly surround the aureole of glory: the sublimity of motherhood. The hospital has prided itself on keeping abreast with modem progress in meeting the requirements at this crucial moment in human life, but the ever rapid growth of our communities has compelled the Sister governing body to secure more room in the proposed erection of the new wing.

Holy Name plans to make every adequate convenience possible to the expectant mother and the world's most priceless possession, her baby. It is because like the Church, of which the hospital is a unit, Holy Name regards the individual's needs that she proposes the new addition. No greater contribution can come to the community of Bergen County than this center which will provide a worthy advent for its citizenry into the world.

REV. LEO. J. MARTIN Chaplain.

HOW ISTHE SERVICE PAID FOR?
PATIENTS: All are treated alike. Most pay conscientiously. Many are treated below costs. Some can pay little or nothing.
$253,282.30
GOVERNMENTAL AID: Bergen County and some municipalitieshelp carry part of the cost of free and below-cost care.
$54,900.00
COMMUNITY CHEST: There is no Community Chest in the central part of the County, and no Chest support is received
0
CONTRIBUTIONS: Many friends contribute through acitvities of the Women's Auxiliaries, and directly to the Hospital.
$7,609.60
  MISCELLANEOUS: Nursing school, old accounts, etc.
$14,309.12
EXCESS OF EXPENSE OVER RECEIPTS: Total expense exceeded total receipts from all sources, leaving a net loss for the year
$8,950.57

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL STATEMENT
OPERATING EXPENSES
ADMINISTRATION: Office expense, salaries, supplies, telephone, Sisters' allowances for expenses, etc.
$30,084.84
DIETARY: Cost of food, preparation and serving for 338,264 meals to patients and personnel
97,700.94
HOUSE AND PROPERTY: Heat, light, power, laundry, housekeeping, maintenance of buildings and grounds
90,582.61
PROFESSIONAL CARE OF PATIENTS: Nursing care, nursing instruction, medical and surgical supplies, operating room, delivery room, anesthesia, pharmacy, laboratory, X-Ray, Out-patients, etc.
120,683.20
 
$339,051.59
RECEIPTS FROM PATIENTS
IN-PATIENTS:    
Private
$65,366.05
   
Semi-private
74,896.70
   
Ward -- Full Pay
8,162.77
   
Ward -- Part Pay
4,299.23
   
Special Services
83,047.14
$235,771.89
 
OUT-PATIENTS:
17,510.41
 
   
253,282.30
Excess of expense over receipts from patients (exclusive of depreciation--see note):
THIS IS THE NEW VALUE OF THE HOSPITAL'S FREE AND BELOW COST CARE TO THE PUBLIC
 
$85,769.29
OTHER RECEIPTS
GOVERNMENT AID: Bergen County
*$53,400.00
   
Municipal Contributions
1,500.00
$54,900.00
CONTRIBUTIONS:
Received from auxilliaries
$5,430.35
General Contributions
2,179.25
7,609.60
MISCELLANEOUS:
School of Nursing -- tuition fees
$6,418.15
Collection of old overdue accounts
6,016.41
Other small items
1,874.56
14,309.12
 
$76,818.72
NET LOSS FOR YEAR
$8,950.57
*Actual allotment was $48,000, but there was a carry-over of $5,400 from the previous year.
NOTE: Depreciation of buildings, equipment and furnishings valued at approximately $1,5000.00 was not included in this statement. On a conservative basis it would be $37,000 and would increase the Net Lost by that amount.

 

This financial summary is intended to present a clear and understandable statement of interest to the general public.

Practically all executive, supervisory and technical positions in the hospital are held by Sisters, who receive no compensation beyond their maintenance and small allowances for such items as clothing and educational charges. To afford a true picture of the cost of running and hospital, therefore, the value of the Sisters' unpaid services to the extent of approximately $31,000 has been include as an operating expense.

This is a conservative figure based on less than prevailing salaries for the positions held. While it was not actually paid by the hospital, on the other hand a considerably larger sum was not charged for depreciation. Most of the capital cost of the hospital as it stands today was provided without cost to the people of Bergen County.

ACTIVITIES OF CENTRAL AUXILIARY

THE original obligation assumed by Central Auxiliary of Holy Name Hospital was the furnishing of all gauze by the hospital. But the auxiliaries steadily increased their activities every year, until now each of the twenty-two auxiliaries annually fulfills four major Central obligations. If the efforts of the individual auxiliary more than support these obligations, they then use their surplus moneys to supply some major gift to the hospital.

The first of these activities is the Linen Shower which is held annually, the Second Sunday in May. At this time the hospital linen supply is completely replenished. Each auxiliary arranges and decorates its own booth in the auditorium of the nurses' home, carrying out the blue and white colors of Central Auxiliary.

In June Central Auxiliary entertains the graduating class of nurses at a tea during class week and each member of the class is presented with a gift. On the last Sunday in October all of the auxiliaries participate in the Harvest Festival. Booths in the nurses' auditorium are decorated in the seasonal colors of orange and yellow. The booths display the gifts of canned goods, fruit, fruits juices, yearly supply of ice cream mix, jellies, jams and beverages. We again entertain the friends of the hospital, who are invited to visit the various departments in the hospital.

Then the season of Christmas is with us. Each auxiliary is represented on the committee of women who decorate the hospital, chapel and nurses' home. The entire staff, personnel and all the patients at the hospital are our guests at Christmas dinner. Holy Name Hospital greets the Christmastide in a beautiful blue and silver dress and the visitors are filled with the joys of the Holy Season.

The Central Auxiliary of Holy Name Hospital was organized on March 12, 1925 at Trinity Lyceum, Hackensack, New Jersey, under the direction of Mrs. Howard Kohl.

The object of this organization is to direct the local auxiliaries established in the various municipalities of Bergen County and vicinity in their activities of work and play in the interests of Holy Name Hospital.

Any woman in Bergen County or vicinity in sympathy with the object of this organization is eligible for membership in any of the twenty-one auxiliaries.

Excerpt from Constitution and By-Laws.


THE AUXILIARIES
PAST PRESIDENTS OF CENTRAL AUXILIARY
Mrs. Howard Kohl 1925-1927 Mrs. Everet Carter 1932-1934
Mrs. john R. McConville 1927-1929 Mrs. P. Ralph McFeely 1934-1936
Mrs. Francis A. Banville 1929-1932 Mrs. Charles S. McHugh 1936-1938
    Mrs. Edward A. Martin 1938-1940


OFFICERS OF CENTRAL AUXILIARY FOR 1941
Dr. Irene D. Pindar President    
Mrs. James A. Lynch First Vice President Mrs. Frank S. Leonard Record Secretary
Mrs. Charles J. Greene Second Vice President Mrs. Arthur Albert Corresponding Secretary
Mrs. Georce Kelley Third Vice President Mrs. Theodore W. Kloman Treasurer

 

 
Stanking Committes
 
Publicity Hospitality Historian
Mrs. William P Ahearn Miss Ann McGinnis Mrs. James P. Boughton
Mrs. Edward Gaston Mrs. John A. Kraus Mrs. James B. Franklin
Mrs. Louis a. Nessi Mrs. Arthur W. Kopp  

 

PRESIDENTS OF LOCAL AUXILIARIES
BERGENFIELD Mrs. Louis C. Jabelsnik HASBROUCK HEIGHTS Mrs. C. Springrose
BOGOTA Mrs. Harry J. Campa LEONIA Mrs. William H. Bovers
CLIFFSIDE-FAIRVIEW, JRS. Mrs. Alice Naedler NEW MILFORD Mrs. Catherine Schaberg
CLIFFSIDE-FAIRVIEW, SRS. Mrs. Charles Sturm PALISADES PARK Mrs. james Fordyce
CRESSKILL Mrs. John Beach RIDGEFIELD Mrs. Charles J. Greene
CHILDREN'S WARD Mrs. Edward V. Sexton RIDGEFIELD PARK Mrs. John McCann
EDGEWATER Mrs. James Bain LOWER TEANECK Mrs. Ashley Walker
ENGLEWOOD Mrs. Charles A. Emise UPPER TEANECK Mrs. John R. Flannery
FORT LEE Mrs. Oresti C. Cassi TENAFLY Mrs. F. S. Leonard, Jr.
GRANTWOOD Mrs. William P. Ahearn THE CHARITY GUILD Mrs. Arthur Albert
HACKENSACK Miss Ann McGinnis WESTWOOD Mrs. Thomas J. Bromilow

 

This year, in addition to our usual activies we are cooperating with the building fund campaign in every possible manner to insure the success of the campaign for the new hospital wing.

Throughout the year our director Sister St. Jude is ever our guide and inspiration.

Central Auxiliary holds two benefit parties during the year. We are deeply grateful to our many friends whose generous assistance is not only encouraging, but makes possible the extended scope of our auxiliary work.

Our newest obligation is the complete X-Ray equipment for the new wing.

Our affiliated auxiliaries welcome new members and WE extend our invitation to YOU to join with us and assis the Sisters of St. Joseph of Holy Name Hospital in furthering their widespread charity.

Irene D. Pindar, M. D., President of Central Auxiliary

ACTIVITIES OF THE LOCAL AUXILIARIES

ONCE A YEAR a joint all-day surgical dressings meeting is held by all auxiliaries. In 1925 the quantity of gauze used by the hospital was 10,000 yards. In 1940 the yarclage was 90,000. Each auxiliary also has its own surgical dressings meeting. The types of dressings made are appendectomy sponges, ear sponges, laparatomy sponges, tape sponges and 2 x 2 and 4 x 4 dressings.

Each auxiliary has its own Sewing Chairman under the direction of the Central Sewing Chairman. The hospital is kept supplied with various size sheets, towels, tray covers, sterile wraps, gowns, glove cases, bassinet lining, clysis cases, hot water bottle covers, bed pan covers, drum covers, points, surgical stockings, caps, gowns, masks, mitts, sleeves, binders and pillow cases.

MAJOR GIFTS BY THE AUXILIARIES FOR 1940

Bronchoscope Nurses' Houme:
Children's Floor Maintenance   Cafeteria
Clinic:   Hot Plate Service
  Furnishings for four rooms   Furnishing of three rooms
  Equipment of Dental and Orthopedic Clinics Physiotheraphy Equipment
Convalescent Porch, Fourth Floor Portable X-Ray Equipment
Maternity: Resuscitator and Inhalator
  Linoleum Floor covering for Labor Room, Ward No. 1, Ward No. 2, Diet Kitchen and nineteen Bed Room. Furnishing of Hospital Rooms Nos. 113, 406 and 411
  Suction Machine
  Furnishings for Main Floor Waiting Room


MEDICAL STAFF

CONSULTING STAFF

Department of Surgery Dr. E. R. Cuniffe, New York
  Dr. H. Dawson Furniss, New York
  Dr. Allen O. Whipple, New York
Department of Medicine Dr. Authur Chace, New York
  Dr. John Keating, New York
  Dr. Joseph Morrow, Ridgewood
Department of Obstetrics Dr. Samuel Cosgrove, Jersey City
Department of Pediatrics Dr. Joseph Regan, Brooklyn
Department of Orthopedics Dr. Fred Albee, New York
Department of Neurology Dr. Edwin Zabriskie, New York
Department of Otolaryngology and Opthalmology Dr. J. D. Kelly, New York
  Dr. Olin Farley, New York
  Dr. James McGrath, Bronchoscopy, New York
Department of Urology Dr. George Cahill, New York
Department of Dermatology Dr. George McKee, New York
Department of Pathology Dr. L. C. Knox, New York
  Dr, James Ewing, New York
Department of Radiology Dr. Francis C. Wood, New York
Department of Dental Surgery Dr. Louis Hayes, New York
  Dr. Charles Gallagher, Hackensack


ACTIVE STAFF

Medical Director Frank C. McCormack, M. D., F.A.C.S.
Department of Surgery George P. Kitkin, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief Surgeon
  Frank C. McCormack, M.D., F..A.C.S., Asspcoate Chief Surgeon
  Sidney F. Johnston, M. D.
  Luke a. Mulligan, M.D., F.A.C.S.
  Maurice M. Lynch, M.D., F.A.C.S.
  Charles G. Prather, M.D.
  Arthur A. Scullion, M.D.
Department of Medicine Paul A. Kennedy, M.D.,F.A.C.P., Chief
  John F. Baldwin, M.D.
  John D. Dickson, M.D.
  Robert R. Grimes, M.D.
  Johesh R. Helff, M.D.
  Winfield Kilts, M.D.
  Joseph R. Pedevill, M.D.
  Frank J. Vita, M.D.
Department of Pediatrics Edward P. Essertier, M.D., F.A.C.P., Chief
  Frank S. White, M.D., Associate Chief
  Victor A. Blenkle, M.D.
  Ralph D. Denig, M.D.
  Frederick S. Leonard, Jr., M.D.
  William B. Prout, M.D.
  Joseph A. Rowe, M.D.
  J. L. York, M.D.
Department of Obstetrics Charles A.Knox, M.D., Chief
  Thomas R. Carroll, M.D.
  Henry D'Agostin, M.D., F.A.C.S.
  John J. Danielson, M.D.
  Joseph F. Duffy, M.D.
  Francis A. Macaulay, M.D.
  Lorenz C. Nicol, M.D.
  John W.Prather, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Department of Orthopedics Frederick D. Dilger, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief
  Robert Neville, M.D.
Dept. of Otorhinology & Ophthalmology Charles N. Dezer, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief
  William C. Giordano, M.D.
  Edward F.Grueninger, M.D.
  Samuel T. Hubbard, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Department of URology John J. O'Connor, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief
  Donald J. Kissinger, M.D.
Department of Anesthesia Leo J. Fitzpatrick, M.D., F.A.C.A., Chief
  D'Arcy C. Clarie, M.D.
Department of Pathology Luther A. Markley, M.D.
Department of Roentgenology Arthur M. Hambright, M.D.
Department of Dental Surgery Alfred W. Nelson, D.D.S., Chief
  Calvin A. Barnes, D.D.S.
  R. W. Drews, D.D.S.
  Robert B. Fear, D.D.S.
  Henry W. Mustermann, D.D.S.
  L. R. Schilling, D.D.S.
Transfusionist Edward V. Sexton, M.D.
Cardiologist Paul A. Kennedy, M.D., F.A.C.P.
Radiologist Conde Pallen, M.D.
Neurologist Paul J. Buckley, M.D., Chief
  Richard E. H. Duisberg, M.D.
Physiotherapy Clarence W. Byers, M.D.
  Frederick D. Dilger, M.D., F.A.C.S.


CLINIC STAFF

Chief of Clinic Clarence B. Byers, M.D.
Surgery Joseph coughlin, M.D.
  Joseph D. Gatti, M.D.
  R. Bryan Hillsman, M.D.
  Frank A. Patti, M.D.
  Arthur W. Pindar, M.D.
Medicine Philip J. McLaren, M. D.
  Edward R. Neary, M.D.
  Edward E. Wolfe, M.D.
Pediatrics Osborne Christensen, M.D.
  Henry E. Prall, M.D.
  James L. York, M.D.
Obstetrical Paul Angellillis, M.D.
  John J. Danielson, M.D.
  Frank L. Lombardi, M.D.
Diabetic Edward E. Wolfe, M.D.
Dermatology Alfred T. V. Brennan, M.D.
  F. J. Marx, M.D.
Ear, Eye, Nose and Throat Edward F. Grueninger, M.D.
Orthopedic George D. Appold, M.D.
(NAMES ARE LISTED ALPHABETICALLY IN EACH DEPARTMENT)


COMBINED STAFF (Comprising Active and courtesy Staffs)
* Member of Active Staff

BERGENFIELD EDGEWATER
Georg D. Appold, M.D. A. Brogman, M.D.
*Frank L. Lombardi, M.D. C. F. Buckley, M.D.
*George P. Pitkin, M.D.  
*Lloyd B. Whitman, M.D. ENGLEWOOD
  G. Barton Barlow, M.D.
BOGOTA *Alfred T.V. Brennan, M.D.
*Paul J. Buckley, M.D. Lyman Burnham, M.D.
*John D. Dickson, M.D. P. Busicco, M.D.
*P. R. McFeely, M.D. *R. W. Drews, D.D.S.
*L. C. Nicol, M.D. J. H. Irwin, M.D.
A. F. Padden, M. D. A. R. Jenkins, M. D.
  Leonard Johnson, M. D.
CLIFFSIDE W. L. Jordan, M. D.
*Henry D'Agostin, M.D. Floyde Keir, M.D.
W. W. Schmidt, M.D. *Paul A. Kennedy, M.D.
*Arthur Scullion, M.D. *Frank C. McCormack, M.D.
  A. Donald McLane, M.D.
  Walter Phillips, M.D.
  E.M. Tennis, M.D.
CLIFFSIDE PARK George Worcester, M.D.
J. L. Brown, M.D  
J. M. Coppoletta, M.D. FAIRVIEW
W. W. Mockett, M.D. J. A. Villegas, M.D.
*Frank J. Vita, M.D. Joseph F. Videtti, M.D.
   
CLOSTER FORT LEE
C. D. Cochran, M.D. John Crandall, M.D.
  M. Sandler, M.D.
COYTESVILLE  
R. Carbone, M. D. GRANTWOOD
  *T. R. Carroll, M.D.
CRESKILL *William Fessler, M.D.
S. G. Loman, M.D. *Edward F. Grueninger, M.D.
  Henry E. Prall, M.D.
DUMONT  
J. R. Grimes, M.D. HACKENSACK
J. O. Halpern, M.D. R. M. Anderson, M.D.
*Donald J. Kissinger, M.D. *P. Angellillis, M.D.
*John W. Prather, M.D. R. N. Berke, M.D.
George O. Rowohlt, M.D. *Ralph D. Denig, M.D.
H. J. Sealey, M.D. J. Willis Demarest, M.D.
*C. N. Deser, M.D. *Frank A. Patti, M.D.
*Frederick D. Dilger, M.D. H. A. Pierce, M.D.
*Edward P. Essertier, M.D. Frances B. Tyson, M.D.
*Vincent Farmer, M.D.  
*Robert E. Fear, M.D.  
A. I. Friedman, M.D. LITTLE FERRY
John H. D. Finke, M.D. Edward Mancene, M.D.
*Joseph D. Gatti, M.D.  
Ralph C. Gilady, M.D.  
I. Gittelsohn, M.D. LYNDHURST
Arthur Greenfield, M.D. P. F. Liva, M.D.
William J. Greenfield, M.D. D. G. Francy, M.D.
Frederick Hallett, M.D.  
William K. Harryman, M.D.  
*Samuel Hubbard, M.D.. MAYWOOD
G. M. Knowles, M.D. W. M. Fliegel, M.D.
A. Liva, M.D. L. A. Hitzemann, M.D.
*M. M. Lynch, M. D. E. E. Jacobitte, M.D.
A. I. Mader, M.D.  
*James Neville, D.D.S.  
*Robert Neville, M.D. NEW MILFORD
*C. Pallen, M.D. B. J. Ellmers, M.D.
William C. Rucker, M.D. *J. L. York, M.D.
Michael Saria, M.D.  
S. T. Snedecor, M.D.  
*A. V. Spiegelglass, M.D. NORTH BERGEN
H. B. Wilson, M.D. Peter J. Bonanno, M.D.
H. B. Wolowitz, M.D. *John J. Danielson, M.D.
  B. Milnis, M.D.
HARRINGTON PARK John J. McCarthy, M.D.
R. O. Johnston, M.D. Henry J. Schwarz, M.D.
   
HASBROUCK HEIGHTS NORTHVALE
*Osborne Christensen, M.D. Joseph Bono, M.D.
S. R. Schiro, M.D.  
T. M. Walsh, M.D. ORADELL
  William T. Knight, M.D.
HAWORTH S. B. Reich, M.D.
*Luther A. Markley, M.D. *William S. Spranz, M.D.
  *L. R. Schilling, M.D.
HILLSDALE  
A. M. Romano, M.D. PALISADES PARK
  Joseph C. Baun, M.D
LEONIA L. Kosminsky, M.D. .
R. R. Balze, M.D. *Edward R. Neary, M.D.
*Luke A. Mulligan, M.D. *Joseph R. Pedevill, M.D.
*H. W. Mustermann, D.D.S. E. J. Salva, M.D.
  B. S. Bookstaver, M.D.
PARK RIDGE *Joseph Coughlin, M.D.
H. Oren, M.D. *Richard E. H. Duisberg, M.D.
H. H. Vandersluis, M.D. Walter J. Farr, M.D.
  Fred Fechner, M.D.
RAMSEY H. B. Fermaglish, M.D.
*Arthur M. Hambright, M.D. Robert R. Grimes, M.D.
  Louis F. Harter, M.D.
  *Joseph R. Helff, M.D.
RIDGEFIELD *R. Bryan Hillsman, M.D.
*D'Arcy C. Clarie, M.D. *Winfield Kilts, M.D.
William C. Glordano, M.D. Charles Littmann, M.D.
H. J. Horowitz, M.D. *Francis A. Macaulay, M.D.
Joseph Toal, M.D. *Alfred W.Nelson, D.D.S.
A. J. Verdon, M.D. *Arthur W. Pindar, M.D.
  *William B. Prout, M.D.
  C. Ringe, M.D.
RIDGEFIELD PARK *Edward V. Sexton, M.D.
Leonard Brown, M.D. *Frank S. White, M.D.
*A. D. Casciano, M.D. Gladys Winter, M.D.
David Corn, M.D. *Edward E. Wolfe, M.D.
William F. Fitzhugh, M.D.  
*Leo J. Fitzpatrick, M.D. TENAFLY
I. D. Jukofsky, M.D. *Frederick S. Leonard, Jr., M.D.
*Charles A. Knox, M.D. E. T. Seymour, M.D.
   
RIDGEWOOD WESTWOOD
Ward Denison, M.D. *Joseph F. Duffy, M.D.
*Joseph A. Rowe, M.D. Davic Goldberg, M.D.
  Guilford Levitas, D.D.S.
  I. M. levitas, M.D.
RIVER EDGE Philip J. Maclaren, M.D.
*F. J. Marx, M.D. *Charles G. Prather, M.D.
   
ROCHELLE PARK WOODCLIFF LAKE
*Sidney F. Johnston, M.D. C. H. Tannert, M.D.
   
RUTHERFORD WOOD RIDGE
*Clarence W. Byers, M.D. *Louis C. Cartnick, M.D.
   
TEANECK HUDSON HEIGHTS
J. F. Baldwin, M.D. Walter F. Modrys, M.D.
*Calvin A. Barnes, D.D.S.  
*Victor A. Blankle, M.D.  


ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Sister M. Evangelista, Superior Sister M. Alphonsus, Administrator
Department Heads
Sister M. Aloysia, Laboratory Sister M. Justina, Laundry
Sister M. Annette, Pediatrics Sister M. Kevin, Operating Room
Sister M. Bellermine, Night Supervisor Sister M. Pulcheria, Delivery Room
Sister M. Catherine, Out Patient Department Sister M. Raymond, Record Room
Sister M. Dolores, Superintendent of School of Nursing Sister M. Rosalie, Dietician
Sister M. Fidelis, X-Ray Department Sister M. St. Jude, Housekeeper
Sister M. James, Bookeeper Sister M. Vincent, Surgical Floor Supervisor


HOLY NAME HOSPITAL TEANECK, NEW JERSEY

A voluntary general hospital serving all of Bergen County and portions of adjoiningcounties.

Approved by the American College of Surgeons.

Registered by the American Medical Association. Approved for the training of internes.

Member of the American Hospital Association, the Catholic Hospital Association, the New Jersey Hospital Association and the Newark Diocesan Hospital Council of New Jersey.

Member of the Associated Hospital Service of New York and the Hospital Service Plan of New Jersey.

School of Nursing Approved by the New Jersey State Board of Nurse Examiners.